Jacqui Dillon Interview on Radio New Zealand with Kathryn Ryan

As many of you are already aware , the Hearing Voices Network Aotearoa NZ is lucky to have Jacqui Dillon in New Zealand at the moment.

Jacqui Dillon is the chairperson for the Hearing Voices Network in UK ( where they have well over 150 support groups.) She is here for the Building Bridges Conference in Wellington this week. Next week she will be in Auckland for the ISPS  Conference.

Jacqui was interviews on the Nine to Noon programme. A great interview. She talks candidly about her own experience- what it is like for her to hear voices. She stresses the importance of understanding voices, explaining how she has been able to change her distressing voices to become of help to her.

A campaigner also for the abolition of the Schizophrenia label, Jacqui talks of how there is no physical test that proves that Schizophrenia is a brain disease, a chemical imbalance, or a genetic disposition. It is a set of symptoms that have become medicalised into something that is not helpful to many labelled with this name.

Listen to the interview here on the Radio New Zealand website  presented by Kathryn Ryan.

Living with Voices-50 Stories of Recovery- new book released-ISBN13 9781906254223

This is a new book released, edited By Marius Romme, Sandra Escher, Jacqui Dillon, Mervyn Morris and Dick Cortens –

It looks like a must read for anyone who hears voices, or works with those who are distressed by them.

A new analysis of the hearing voices experience outside the illness model, resulted in accepting and making sense of voices. This study of 50 stories forms the evidence for this successful new approach to working with voice hearers.

This book demonstrates that it is entirely possible to overcome problems with hearing voices and to take back control of one’s life. It shows a path to recovery by addressing the main problems voice hearers describe – the threats, the feelings of powerlessness, the anxiety of being mad – and helps them to find their way back to their emotions and spirituality and to realising their dreams. This book also holds true for those who have been given a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

At the heart of this book are the stories of fifty people who have recovered from the distress of hearing voices. They have overcome the disabling social and psychiatric attitudes towards voice hearing and have also fought with themselves to accept and make sense of the voices. They have changed their relationship with their voices in order to reclaim their lives.

All the people in this book describe their recovery; how they now accept their voices as personal, and how they have learnt to cope with them and have changed their relationship with them. They have discovered that their voices are not a sign of madness but a reaction to problems in their lives that they couldn’t cope with, and they have found that there is a relationship between the voices and their life history, that the voices talk about problems that they haven’t dealt with – and that they therefore make sense.

Our own Debra Lampshire well known in New Zealand for her work with those that heaer voices, has her story within its pages.

If you want to order the book it is available online here from their publisher PCC books 

IF anyone has read it, I would love to hear your comments.