Stories to Awaken the Inner hero

We have completed our series of workshops, Stories to Awaken your Inner Hero in Christchurch, Wellington and Auckland with Dr Lewis Mehl-Madrona and Barbara Mainguy. What a great workshop it was. We discovered the healing power of story, the emotional power of using metaphor. The gift it was to be able to listen to someones life challenges, and turn it into a Heros story, using metaphor. The story of Pack rat and First mother, told by Lewis, reminding us all, just like the Heros, not to give up. That by creating a metaphorical story we we become the hero and succeeds, our brains, and spirits began to start searching for a way to create that success on a deeper level.

Uplifting, and engaging.

Here is an interview with Lewis and Barbara before the workshops, talking about it.

Heroes story interview Lewis Mehl Madrona & Barbara Mainguy

July 26th 2014- Event Paris Williams Psychologist and Author, and Beyond the Medical Model screening

rethinking Madness

 

On July 26th 2014, The Hearing Voices Network Aotearoa NZ are hosting a talk by Paris Williams Psychologist and Author of Rethink Madness- www.rethinkingmadness.com 

We will share afternoon tea, then have a screening of the excellent ‘ Beyond the Medical Model’

See the trailer

All welcome.

Fickling Center, 546 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings, Auckland
12.30pm to 3.30pm
Come along and hear Paris Williams, watch the movie, and share afternoon tea and discussion. All are welcome.
COST: $5 for waged. Voice hearers and HVNANZ members free.
We will hold our Hearing Voices Network Annual General meeting afterwards at 3.30-4.30pm if you are interested in making a difference, please stay and join in.
For Bookings please email: hvnanz@gmail.com or tel : 027 265 0266

 

ONLY Son- winner of the 2010 V48hrs Film festival

This NZ short film was made in the V48 48hr film festival and won  in 2010. It is billed as a ghost story, but could also be billed as a “hearing voices” story.
It is humourous and also a little bit rude , so please be forewarned to not to watch it if that type of content offends.
Sometimes it helps to laugh.
 
 
It can be viewed on youtube here
 
Or also on the NZ herald website here
 

“The Insatiable Moon”- a NZ Movie

I went and saw this movie on Sunday night. What a great movie it was too. Filmed around Grey Lynn and Ponsonby it is a movie based on the book by Mike Riddell. It is inspired by real experiences. At the heart of the film is a boarding house where ex psychiatric patients live, as the asylums have closed. Arthur, is one of these boarders. He says he hears the voice of God and that he is the second son of God.

A real gem. It is a film that has a very respectful way about it. Showing the importance of compassion in our material world.

You can see the review from the NZ Herald here here is an excerpt

And there were the twilight people: mainly men, they were the product of the new “community mental health” initiatives, unreliably medicated psychiatric patients living on benefits in the boarding houses that were a feature of the landscape.

Mike Riddell knows something of that demi-monde because he moved in it. A theologian by training, he was the vicar at the Ponsonby Baptist Church in Jervois Rd, a ministry in which he often rubbed shoulders with the psych patients. I recall a moving funeral service he conducted there for a childhood friend of mine, Alan Stimpson, a florid, gentle-giant schizophrenic who had taken his own life.

“People like Alan would have a social welfare grant to pay for their funeral,” Riddell recalls, “but it wasn’t enough. So we had an arrangement with an undertaker that he would lend us a coffin so we could put on a funeral and then they’d bury him in something more modest.

The Baptist system is a fairly miserable bloody denomination in some ways but the Ponsonby Baptist Church happened to be a group of people who were a bit more broadminded and interested in people. There was so much humanity and humour at those funerals. They were great.”

Just such a funeral is a central scene in The Insatiable Moon and it’s filmed at Ponsonby Baptist – “It was the director of photography’s decision because he liked the inside of the church,” says Riddell.

One character’s eulogy consists of repaying the deceased’s many kindnesses by laying a cigarette on the coffin lid. “That’s a tailor-made too,” she adds for emphasis.

So it goes without saying that The Insatiable Moon is a portrait drawn from life. Riddell wrote it as a novel and then, over several years, adapted it into the screenplay for the film which an opening title describes as “inspired by Arthur of Ponsonby”.

“Arthur lived in a boarding house that doesn’t exist any more down Shelly Beach Rd,” says Riddell. “He was a lovely guy, a big fella with long hair, who looked a bit like [Tuhoe prophet and activist] Rua Kenana. He was illiterate but very engaging and charismatic, a fluent Maori speaker.

“He used to come into the vicarage sometimes and ask me to tell people that he was the second son of God, so we used to have great conversations. And after one of those sessions I thought: ‘Gee, what if he is the second son of God? How would I know?’ And that was the creative spark for the story.”

To say that it sounds improbable, even banal, is to understate matters. But Riddell makes it work, both by his unforced skill as a writer and the deep humanity of the story.

The same humanity infuses the film, one of the most modest Kiwi flicks in a long time, but one that gets under your skin. A cast to die for includes Rawiri Paratene as Arthur (when people say “Lovely day”, he replies “Thanks. Glad you like it”; Sara Wiseman as Margaret, a social worker whose marital crisis puts her on a collision course with Arthur; a terrific Ian Mune as an unrepentant dero; and show-stealer Greg Johnson, as the cheerfully foul-mouthed and relentlessly good-hearted proprietor of the boarding house that is home to Arthur and the other psych patients. And the story, a winning mix of pathos, humour and, well, wonder, concerns the challenge posed to Arthur’s celestial pedigree when the boarding house is threatened with closure.”

 The official website is here http://www.theinsatiablemoon.com/

Here is the trailer

RAIN OF THE CHILDREN- BY VINCENT WARD on Maori TV tonight Sunday 4th July 8.30pm

Rain of the Children  a great New Zealand drama documentary made by New Zealander Vincent Ward is showing on Maori TV tonight Sunday 4th July in NZ at 8.30pm. You can see the trailer below

I reviewed it in one of the HVN newsletters. Here is my review

” Rain of the Children is a fascinating movie. It is the telling of the story of a Tuhoe woman Puhi. Vincent Ward stayed with Puhi and her mentally ill son when he was first starting out as a film maker. The movie includes footage that he took at this time.

This latest movie is his attempt to go back and tell the story of the life of Puhi and her son Nikki and to make sense of it. Puhi was the bride of the son of the Maori prophet Rua Kenana.  The movie contains excellent photos of the settlement they built. Creating a fascinating rendition of the life that Puhi led. It carefully illustrates the trauma and upheaval that the Maori people faced during the colonisation of New Zealand.  Everything about their former way of lives were challenged, their religion, beliefs, and their very survival as many of their people died from disease brought by the European settlers.

Amongst the trauma, Puhi has many events happen that lead everyone to believe that she has been cursed. She is shown years later walking along constantly praying, to keep the curse from affecting her and her family.

Her son hears voices. According to the movie, one day he became lost in the forest. He was lost for several days. When he was finally found and returned to his family  he was hearing voices. He also had a very special bond with animals and his family believed that he had been taken by the “Patupairehe”and explores some of Maori beliefs in this area.

  It is a mixture of re-enactment and actual footage, which together creates a story that is well worth watching, if only to gain a better understanding of what Maori went through at the time and to wonder how these effects may be felt today.”

A great watch.

David Rosenhans Experiment

Wikipedia site states that David Ronsehan conducted this experiment in 1973, where he sent volunteers into Psychiatric hospitals , to prove that the diagnostic and treatment regime was no good. it says this

Rosenhan himself and eight mentally healthy associates, called “pseudopatients”, attempted to gain admission to psychiatric hospitals by calling for an appointment and feigning auditory hallucinations. The hospital staffs were not informed of the experiment. The pseudopatients were a psychology graduate student in his twenties, three psychologists, a pediatrician, a psychiatrist, a painter and a housewife. None had a history of mental illness. Pseudopatients used pseudonyms, and those who worked in the mental health field were given false jobs in a different sector to avoid invoking any special treatment or scrutiny. Apart from giving false names and employment details, further biographical details were truthfully reported.

During their initial psychiatric assessment, they claimed to be hearing voices of the same sex as the patient which were often unclear, but which seemed to pronounce the words “empty”, “hollow”, “thud” and nothing else. These words were chosen as they vaguely suggest some sort of existential crisis and for the lack of any published literature referencing them aspsychotic symptoms. No other psychiatric symptoms were claimed. If admitted, the pseudopatients were instructed to “act normally,” report that they felt fine and no longer heard voices. Hospital records obtained after the experiment indicate that all pseudopatients were characterized as friendly and cooperative by staff.

All were admitted, to 12 different psychiatric hospitals across the United States, including rundown and underfunded public hospitals in rural areas, urban university-run hospitals with excellent reputations, and one expensive private hospital. Though presented with identical symptoms, 11 were diagnosed with schizophrenia at public hospitals, and one with manic-depressive psychosis, a more optimistic diagnosis with better clinical outcomes, at the private hospital. Their stays ranged from 7 to 52 days, and the average was 19 days. All were discharged with a diagnosis of schizophrenia “in remission,” which Rosenhan takes as evidence that mental illness is perceived as an irreversible condition creating a lifelong stigma rather than a curable illness.

Then in a twist when one hospital claimed that there is no way they would so such a thing, he did this:

The non-existent impostor experiment

For this experiment, Rosenhan used a well-known research and teaching hospital, whose staff had heard of the results of the initial study but claimed that similar errors could not be made at their institution. Rosenhan arranged with them that during a three month period, one or more pseudopatients would attempt to gain admission and the staff would rate every incoming patient as to the likelihood they were an impostor. Out of 193 patients, 41 were considered to be impostors and a further 42 were considered suspect. In reality, Rosenhan had sent no pseudopatients and all patients suspected as impostors by the hospital staff were genuine patients. This led to a conclusion that “any diagnostic process that lends itself too readily to massive errors of this sort cannot be a very reliable one”. Studies by others found similarly problematic diagnostic results.

He published the results in SCIENCE.

Here is an excerpt from the BBC Documentary THE TRAP, about it.

What the Bleep do we know? And Down the Rabbit hole.

These movies are so great. They really open up your mind to the possibilities of the Universe, consciousness, and what is reality. A documentary combining science – quantum physics with spiritual concepts and consciousness.

I know they are oldies- have been put for some time. But they are still goodies, so decided they should be on here.

Below are  the trailers from you tube.

WHAT THE BLEEP DO WE KNOW

WHAT THE BLEEP DO WE KNOW- DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE

They are available on DVD- documentary style.