Connecting with Ceremony Ancestors

We had a fabulous workshop today, in Auckland, the last of a series of worskhops in New Zealand with Lewis Mehl Madrona and Barbara Mainguy. We made prayer ties, and heard stories of how the Native American Lakota and Cherokee saw the creation of the world and the communication with spirit and the ancestors. We performed a fire ceremony, and partook in a  chanunpa  ceremony.

the  peace and connection everyone felt from the day was beautiful. I must say that they are two fabulous and genuine people. Their teachings touched all our hearts.

Here is an interview with them, before we held the workshop, talking a little about the ancestors

Ceremony & Ancestors Lewis & Barbara

 

Healing Voices movie premiere Dunedin

We are excited to announce that  there will also be a screening in Dunedin of this movie.

We are awaiting the poster.

But for any bookings in the meantime details are as below

 

7pm Friday April 29th

McMillan Room

Dunedin Community House

Corner of Moray Place and Great King Street

Bookings essential as venue holds 50 seats

Contact Grant from Otago Mental Health support Trust on 477 2598 or emailotagomd@ihug.co.nz

 

HEALING VOICES – Movie Premiere April 29 2016

The Hearing Voices Network Aotearoa NZ in conjunction with ISPS, and Affinity NZ are pleased to announce we are holding a screening of the Movie Healing Voices.
HEALING VOICES is a new social action documentary which will be released via grass roots, non-theatrical premiere events around the world on April 29, 2016. Written and Directed by PJ Moynihan of Digital Eyes Film, HEALING VOICES explores the experience commonly labeled as ‘psychosis’ through the stories of real-life individuals, and asks the question:  What are we talking about when we talk about ‘mental illness’? The film follows three subjects – Oryx, Jen, Dan – over nearly five years, and features interviews with notable international experts including:  Robert Whitaker, Dr. Bruce Levine, Celia Brown, Will Hall, Dr. Marius Romme, and others, on the history of psychiatry and the rise of the ‘medical model’ of mental illness.  Community screening partners will host HEALING VOICES premiere events in their local markets on 4.29.16, which will be followed by audience discussion around dialogue topics relating to the content of the film. The documentary is ideal for individuals with lived experience in the mental health system, educators, peer counselors, advocates, researchers, psychiatrists, psychologists, healthcare workers, first responders, family members, or anyone who has been touched by mental health issues in their life.
MOVIE TRAILER HERE
The Huffington Post here
says this:

Writer and director PJ Moynihan explores two question: What are we talking about when we talk about “mental illness”? What is truly helpful?

Over a five year period, Healing Voices follows Oryx, Jen, and Dan, all previously diagnosed with serious mental illness. Oryx, Jen, and Dan are each very different personalities but all are articulate, insightful, and fascinating in describing their return journeys from extreme states of consciousness to satisfying human relationships and meaningful work.

Healing Voices is not afraid to discuss aspects of our humanity that routinely terrify many of us, and Moynihan is also not afraid to make his movie fun and joyful—including playful music and animations. What is striking about Healing Voices is its combination of boldness and humility—its boldness challenging political correctness and its humility about its own assertions.

RADIO INTERVIEW HERE

https://soundcloud.com/kinkfm/healing-voices

Please see the details of our event at the Pumphouse in Takapuna on the 29th April, on the attached jpeg.

Space is limited so book asap! 

Regards

Adrienne Giacon

Chair

HVNANZ

www.hearingvoices.org.nz

Dreams Visions and Realities, Video on ” the dreamtime”

 have just watched this excellent video, with an Aboriginal storyteller Bill Harney and Dr Stephen Aizenstat talking about the “dreaming”. In this context it not only includes night dreaming but also includes ” dreaming” during the day, or hearing from other “entities”, or the Dreamtime.

 
They offer some great insights that can also be applied to anyone hearing voices and having visions.
 
 
 
 

“The Insatiable Moon”- a NZ Movie

I went and saw this movie on Sunday night. What a great movie it was too. Filmed around Grey Lynn and Ponsonby it is a movie based on the book by Mike Riddell. It is inspired by real experiences. At the heart of the film is a boarding house where ex psychiatric patients live, as the asylums have closed. Arthur, is one of these boarders. He says he hears the voice of God and that he is the second son of God.

A real gem. It is a film that has a very respectful way about it. Showing the importance of compassion in our material world.

You can see the review from the NZ Herald here here is an excerpt

And there were the twilight people: mainly men, they were the product of the new “community mental health” initiatives, unreliably medicated psychiatric patients living on benefits in the boarding houses that were a feature of the landscape.

Mike Riddell knows something of that demi-monde because he moved in it. A theologian by training, he was the vicar at the Ponsonby Baptist Church in Jervois Rd, a ministry in which he often rubbed shoulders with the psych patients. I recall a moving funeral service he conducted there for a childhood friend of mine, Alan Stimpson, a florid, gentle-giant schizophrenic who had taken his own life.

“People like Alan would have a social welfare grant to pay for their funeral,” Riddell recalls, “but it wasn’t enough. So we had an arrangement with an undertaker that he would lend us a coffin so we could put on a funeral and then they’d bury him in something more modest.

The Baptist system is a fairly miserable bloody denomination in some ways but the Ponsonby Baptist Church happened to be a group of people who were a bit more broadminded and interested in people. There was so much humanity and humour at those funerals. They were great.”

Just such a funeral is a central scene in The Insatiable Moon and it’s filmed at Ponsonby Baptist – “It was the director of photography’s decision because he liked the inside of the church,” says Riddell.

One character’s eulogy consists of repaying the deceased’s many kindnesses by laying a cigarette on the coffin lid. “That’s a tailor-made too,” she adds for emphasis.

So it goes without saying that The Insatiable Moon is a portrait drawn from life. Riddell wrote it as a novel and then, over several years, adapted it into the screenplay for the film which an opening title describes as “inspired by Arthur of Ponsonby”.

“Arthur lived in a boarding house that doesn’t exist any more down Shelly Beach Rd,” says Riddell. “He was a lovely guy, a big fella with long hair, who looked a bit like [Tuhoe prophet and activist] Rua Kenana. He was illiterate but very engaging and charismatic, a fluent Maori speaker.

“He used to come into the vicarage sometimes and ask me to tell people that he was the second son of God, so we used to have great conversations. And after one of those sessions I thought: ‘Gee, what if he is the second son of God? How would I know?’ And that was the creative spark for the story.”

To say that it sounds improbable, even banal, is to understate matters. But Riddell makes it work, both by his unforced skill as a writer and the deep humanity of the story.

The same humanity infuses the film, one of the most modest Kiwi flicks in a long time, but one that gets under your skin. A cast to die for includes Rawiri Paratene as Arthur (when people say “Lovely day”, he replies “Thanks. Glad you like it”; Sara Wiseman as Margaret, a social worker whose marital crisis puts her on a collision course with Arthur; a terrific Ian Mune as an unrepentant dero; and show-stealer Greg Johnson, as the cheerfully foul-mouthed and relentlessly good-hearted proprietor of the boarding house that is home to Arthur and the other psych patients. And the story, a winning mix of pathos, humour and, well, wonder, concerns the challenge posed to Arthur’s celestial pedigree when the boarding house is threatened with closure.”

 The official website is here http://www.theinsatiablemoon.com/

Here is the trailer

RAIN OF THE CHILDREN- BY VINCENT WARD on Maori TV tonight Sunday 4th July 8.30pm

Rain of the Children  a great New Zealand drama documentary made by New Zealander Vincent Ward is showing on Maori TV tonight Sunday 4th July in NZ at 8.30pm. You can see the trailer below

I reviewed it in one of the HVN newsletters. Here is my review

” Rain of the Children is a fascinating movie. It is the telling of the story of a Tuhoe woman Puhi. Vincent Ward stayed with Puhi and her mentally ill son when he was first starting out as a film maker. The movie includes footage that he took at this time.

This latest movie is his attempt to go back and tell the story of the life of Puhi and her son Nikki and to make sense of it. Puhi was the bride of the son of the Maori prophet Rua Kenana.  The movie contains excellent photos of the settlement they built. Creating a fascinating rendition of the life that Puhi led. It carefully illustrates the trauma and upheaval that the Maori people faced during the colonisation of New Zealand.  Everything about their former way of lives were challenged, their religion, beliefs, and their very survival as many of their people died from disease brought by the European settlers.

Amongst the trauma, Puhi has many events happen that lead everyone to believe that she has been cursed. She is shown years later walking along constantly praying, to keep the curse from affecting her and her family.

Her son hears voices. According to the movie, one day he became lost in the forest. He was lost for several days. When he was finally found and returned to his family  he was hearing voices. He also had a very special bond with animals and his family believed that he had been taken by the “Patupairehe”and explores some of Maori beliefs in this area.

  It is a mixture of re-enactment and actual footage, which together creates a story that is well worth watching, if only to gain a better understanding of what Maori went through at the time and to wonder how these effects may be felt today.”

A great watch.

How Mad Are You? On Documentary Channel.

I saw the advert for this briefly the other night. I am sure I caught a glimpse of Richard Bentall there?

It looks very interesting. Here is an excerpt for the program from the Documentary Channels website

‘In 1973, Dr David Rosenhan conducted a seminal experiment (Being Sane in Insane Places) in the USA, during which sane patients faked symptoms to gain admission to psychiatric hospitals and were diagnosed as such; some of them were kept in hospital for up to 52 days. He proved that psychiatry, the science of the mind, couldn’t tell the difference between sanity and insanity. It was an experiment which transformed how mental illness was diagnosed.

Based on some of the ideas behind that experiment, How Mad Are You has brought together 10 volunteers for five days to work through a new series of tasks, conducted by psychologist Professor Peter Kinderman. Five of the volunteers are normal, and five have a history of psychiatric disorders.

The question is simple: which is which?

During the five days, the volunteers are not allowed to discuss their histories as they live and work through the challenges together, facing stressful situations and confronting their fears. The tests are designed to explore the character traits of mental illness and ask whether the symptoms might be within all of us. They include performing stand-up comedy to mucking out cows.

Who will cope best? Will the individuals who have been affected by mental illness reveal themselves? Or will the ‘normal’ but shy volunteer exhibit the oddest behaviour of all?

Mental Illness affects 450 million people worldwide. It preys on all ages, all sexes and all cultures. The path to health can be long and difficult, but for many simply being called ‘mentally ill’ is a heavier burden to carry than the illness itself. Being labelled with a psychiatric disorder brings profound social stigma, leaving some people outcast all their lives.’

It is showing Tuesday 27th April at 8.30pm at Wednesday 28th April 2010 at 4.30pm and 12.30pm.

A friend told me about the experiment that was conducted back then. I will have to see if I can find more details about it and post it here.